Cape Cod Interior Design Shoot

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Cape Cod Interior Design Shoot

Earlier this year, I was given the opportunity to shoot a beautiful home in Cape Cod, Massachusetts for Double Knot Home interior design. I am primarily a regional photographer with a focus on regional clients, but this client had previous ties to the Cape Cod area, and was in need of some updated photos of their personal home that was for sale. Needless to say, I was extremely excited to see a part of the country that I’ve never been to, and study a classic American architecture in the Cape Cod style of home building.

Front Exterior

Rear Exterior

I spent a total of 4 days on the peninsula, and my process of shooting was based around my personal schedule of exploring some of the area as well as trying to get decent weather. I arrived in early June, and despite my optimistic view of the weather, most of the time I was dealing with overcast days and very little breaks in the weather. My primary focus was the interior, however, I really wanted to get some great photos of the exterior of the home.

Aerial view, Home located bottom center

The home itself was around 300 years old, and the interior was meticulously designed over the years that the designer lived there. I’m unfamiliar with the renovation timeline through the years, but the current state of the home has a wonderful open feel, with the living room right in the center of the home. From here, you could access the kitchen, dining room, screened porch, and master bedroom and bathroom.

Living Room

Living Room 2nd Angle

The upper level of the home has 2 bedrooms and 1 bathroom, and in the rear of the home there is access to another bedroom and a breezeway to a laundry area and access to the garage and backyard.

Bedroom

It was a great opportunity to be able to photograph such a wonderful home with a well thought out design and long history. Here are a few more images I particularly loved.

Kitchen Detail

Master Bedroom

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Flower Photos, should I sell prints?

I recently donated some prints for a fundraiser for the Franklinton Board of Trade Gala. Earlier in the year, I had spent some time playing with some studio lighting setups, and because of the local flower shop, I found some beautiful subjects. My process was simple for these photos. I started with a single piece of black acrylic that I purchased on Amazon for $20. Black acrylic is great for a multitude of reasons, but mainly because of it’s reflective nature. The bouquets were broken down into individual stalks, and I used some small clamps to hold them at different angles. I placed the flowers perpendicular to the black acrylic, thus allowing me to use the ceiling as the reflective background. I lit the flowers from the side with a medium sized strip box, and then I placed a strobe off to the side and bounced it off the ceiling, creating a unique splash of light in the reflection of the acrylic. The angle of the bounced light is important, as too much reflected light did not look organic and overpowered the subject. If you are interested in prints, leave a comment below.

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Quick Interior post processing tutorial

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Quick Interior post processing tutorial

Welp, for my first blog post ever, I thought I’d share a video I made recently that shows how I would quickly blend multiple exposures for interior photography post processing. If you’re new to my page and my type of photography, I’m glad you made it here and are reading this post! Interior photography is a wonderful field of photography that encompasses a wide range of techniques in order to produce a quality looking image. There is a major difference between my technique for shooting and processing Real Estate photography vs. my professional Interior photography. In this video I show you how to process an image with only ambient frames. Meaning I did not add any supplemental lighting to the scene. My process bounces between Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop, so if you are interested in following along, make sure you have these programs ready and up to date.

 

Alongside these programs, I’m also using a luminosity mask generator. Luminosity masking is a fairly advanced technique used to generate masks based on the brightest and darkest pixels in the images. These masks range from very wide selections, to very narrow selections, allowing for very targeted blending techniques which can be very hard to replicate with automated HDR software. I use the TK Actions panel by Tony Kuiper found here http://goodlight.us/writing/actionspanelv6/panelv6.html Traditionally, this type of processing was used mainly for landscape photography, but as the demand for higher quality interior photography has grown, many people are using this technique for hand blending photos. There are many alternatives to TK Actions Panel, but I would highly recommend this panel as well as the accompanying video instructional series as it is vital to understanding how to blend images.

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